Supporters

The creation of a UN Parliamentary Assembly is supported by a broad range of individuals and institutions from more than 150 countries.

Individual supporters include politicians, former UN officials, distinguished scholars, cultural innovators, representatives of civil society organizations, and many committed citizens from all walks of life.

In particular, 656 current and 967 former members of parliament across principal party lines have endorsed the campaign to date. The sitting MPs represent an estimated 119 million people. Supporters also include current and former heads of state, foreign ministers, Nobel laureates, and over 400 professors, including from world-leading universities.

Institutions that have expressed support include numerous civil society organizations, parliaments, international parliamentary assemblies and party networks. For instance, the Pan-African Parliament, the European Parliament, the Latin-American Parliament and the Parliament of Mercosur have adopted resolutions – as have the Socialist International, the Liberal International, or the Green World Congress.

An international survey conducted in 2004/5 in 18 countries showed an average support of 63% while only 20% opposed.

Voices

As more and more issues increasingly demand global solutions ... we need to strengthen institutions for global decision-making and make them more responsible to the people they affect. This line of thought leads in the direction of a world community with its own directly elected legislature.

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Peter Singer, Moral philosopher, Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, 2002

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Members of Parliament

from 135 countries endorse the campaign (current and former)

Latest supporters

Dirk Filzek, Germany — Leslie Brissett, United Kingdom — Alejandro Edgar González Flores, Mexico — Alejandro Edgar González Flore, Mexico — William Das, United States — Will Eede, Canada — Guillermo Eede, Canada — Frank Stößel, Germany — William Das, United States — Erik Karlström, Sweden

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Support by elected representatives